Action for birds

What can I do to help?

Did you know the once common starling has declined by over 60% since the mid-seventies? Or that the beautiful song thrush has seen an even greater decline in Britain? Farmland birds and aerial specialists like the swift and swallow have also declined. But we can all help by taking the following action for birds in our local area:

Swift Project

We will work out where they are presently nesting in Wantage and then look to provide extra nesting opportunities nearby.  You can help us with this by:

  • letting us know if you have swifts nesting on your house or nearby
  • contacting us if you think your house might be suitable for a swift box
  • making swift boxes that can be put up in your neighbourhood Create a High Home for Swifts (RSPB)

Garden Bird Project

You can help us with this by:

  • Feeding birds in your garden Bird Feeding Advice (RSPB)
  • Putting up a nestbox in your garden Build a Bird Box (RSPB)
  • Creating a bird bath or small pond for birds to drink from and bathe in
  • Build suitable nest boxes that we can put up in other areas of green space Contact us for advise
  • Plant an extra tree or large shrub for birds to nest in

Farmland Bird Project

This guidance is more for large land owners and farmers who can help by:

  • Feeding farmland birds:  Helping Bird Species (RSPB)
  • If you are a larger landowner, leaving over wintered stubble, cover crops, unharvested headlands or putting out feed for birds in suitable locations can make a huge difference.
  • Creating extra hedgerows or patches of scrub or woodland on your land so that farmland birds have cover and somewhere to nest and feed.  If you already have hedges, cut them less often where possible to leave more food and shelter for wildlife.
  • If your land is suitable create skylark plots.
  • Put up barn owl, kestrel or tawny owl boxes in suitable locations – contact us for advice and we might be able to make you a box.

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Wild Wantage images ©Mark Bradfield / Lucy Duerdoth